Help fund research into kids’ diseases by supporting Jeans for Genes day today

 Pictured are Malachi, Hudson, Cameron, Mason and Chelsea who all donned their jeans in support of the day. Pictures: PETER PICKERING

Pictured are Malachi, Hudson, Cameron, Mason and Chelsea who all donned their jeans in support of the day. Pictures: PETER PICKERING

THIS year marks the 21st birthday of Jeans for Genes Day, a national day when people wear their jeans to raise much-needed funds for research into birth defects and diseases such as cancer, epilepsy and a range of genetic disorders.

On the first Friday in August each year workplaces, schools and streets become a sea of denim in a united stance against childhood disease.

Every dollar raised on the day helps scientists at Children's Medical Research Institute discover treatments and cures, to give every child the opportunity to live a long and healthy life.

First National Real Estate Ararat is holding a barbecue between 12 noon and 2pm today to raise funds to help scientists test a new drug that could treat cancer, epilepsy or other neurological conditions.

This is a drug developed to treat epilepsy which may also cure kidney disease - an unexpected discovery that has the potential to save millions of people from the need for transplants and dialysis.

One week old Ryan, swaddled in a pair of dad’s jeans.

One week old Ryan, swaddled in a pair of dad’s jeans.

The work of the scientists at Children's Medical Research Institute has a single aim - to improve and extend the lives of children everywhere.

One in twenty children is born with a congenital abnormality or genetic disease. That's over 12,000 children born in Australia each year. CMRI is dedicated to changing this.

CMRI has been a pioneer in the field of paediatric medical research since its inception in 1958.

Mason supports Jeans For Genes day by wearing his own pair of blue jeans.

Mason supports Jeans For Genes day by wearing his own pair of blue jeans.

Its many achievements include increasing survival rates of premature babies, establishing Australia's first research unit for newborns, developing life saving microsurgery techniques, and introducing vaccines that protect against a number of potentially fatal or disabling childhood diseases.

When you support Jeans for Genes you are helping unravel cures for future generations of children.

CMRI's vital work does not receive guaranteed government funding and relies on community support.

Head down to First National at lunch time today or purchase some merchandise from Advantage Pharmacy.

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