The Bureau of Meteorology has been criticised in the wake of this weekend's storms

The weather bureau has been criticised in the wake of this weekend's storms, with Victoria's emergency chief saying it has to revise the way it describes extreme events

In radio interviews on Monday, Emergency Management Commissioner Craig Lapsley said the Bureau of Meteorolgy shouldn't have rated the coming storm as a 10.

"I'm not saying the bureau has got it wrong, but '10/10' ... was overused," Mr Lapsley told the ABC.

"I think that set a bar that was right up there."

Emergency Management Commissioner Craig Lapsley at the State Control Centre on Sunday. Photo: Darrian Traynor

Emergency Management Commissioner Craig Lapsley at the State Control Centre on Sunday. Photo: Darrian Traynor

Mr Lapsley told 3AW that the bureau of Meteorology needed to reassess its messaging processes for future weather events.

"I think we've got some work to do [with the bureau] with some of the products," he said.

Senior forecaster Scott Williams warned Victorians on Thursday "half the inhabitants of Melbourne have never ever seen anything like this".

"It is an event that poses a threat to life," he said.

A man walks through flood water in Euroa. Photo: Brendan McCarthy

A man walks through flood water in Euroa. Photo: Brendan McCarthy

Asked to rate the storms out of 10, Mr Williams said "it's going to be pretty close to a 10.

"If you wake up [on Friday] and think it isn't going to happen you'll just have to wait a while. They didn't think the Titanic would sink either but it did," he said.

He went on: "It is an event that poses a threat to life, there will be a massive amount of lightning, there will be roads cut, flood waters.

A Maserati was flooded after the driver tried to navigate a flooded underpass in Seddon on Saturday Photo: Sarah Schubert/Facebook

A Maserati was flooded after the driver tried to navigate a flooded underpass in Seddon on Saturday Photo: Sarah Schubert/Facebook

"I think this event will turn farms into lakes." 

But Melbourne was spared the brunt of the storm, with just 107mm of a predicted 200mm recorded in suburbs Kew, Doncaster and Blackburn.

Regional towns of Myrtleford and Euroa, however, were inundated with rain, with some homes and a caravan park damaged.

The bureau said on Monday that the worst of the bad weather had passed.

There will be some showers continuing into Monday for most of the state but heavy rainfall has abated, bureau forecaster Dean Stewart said.

"In most areas the worst is well and truly over," he said.

"Generally the rain will have stopped in most areas and the flash flooding is subsiding across the state."

However while most of Victoria will be drying out, East Gippsland may get 100 milimetres at the middle of the week.

The storm front hit the state on Friday, with the north-east the worst affected as Euroa, Myrtleford and the Buckland Valley faced severe flooding.

Mr Lapsley said people need to remain vigilant because large amounts of water are still moving down rivers.

"The water will move through and that will take, in some cases, hours or days to do so," he said.

"The message to the Victorian community, particularly in north-east Victoria or Gippsland, is stay tuned about your river system and what it will do in your backyard."

A number of moderate flood warnings remain in place, including for the Yarra, Ovens and King rivers.A community meeting will be held at Euroa on Monday to discuss clean up plans.

Federal Justice Minister Michael Keenan and Victorian Minister for Emergency Services James Merlino on Sunday announced a disaster assistance package for affected Victorians

With AAP