Great Western resident remains positive despite grim battle with Parkinson's

POSITIVE: Bev Boag says determination and thinking positively is the only way to fight Parkinson's. Picture: Peter Pickering

POSITIVE: Bev Boag says determination and thinking positively is the only way to fight Parkinson's. Picture: Peter Pickering

As thousands of Victorians prepare to show their support for people living with Parkinson’s at A Walk in the Park on Sunday, Great Western’s Bev Boag opened up about the difficulty of living with the condition. 

“The overwhelming tiredness is the worst part,” she said.

“I cannot even bend over to do simple tasks- I have to get on my knees.”

More than 27,000 Victorians and 80,000 Australians are currently living with Parkinson's, a chronic and progressive neurological condition which affects movement.

The figure translates to one in 350 Australians with Parkinson’s and a further 30 people are diagnosed with the condition each day. There is no cure.

Ms Boag was diagnosed six years ago and said it took her the first six months to “come to terms with”. 

“later down the track in my life I may end up in a wheelchair, but I try very hard not to think that way,” she said.

“It is important to stay positive.”

Ms Boag took charge of the district’s support network, Grampians Parkinson’s Support Group.

“I try and tell others to think and stay positive,” she said. 

“I often tell people to not think about how they will be in a year- but just to take things day by day.” 

Grampians Parkinson’s Support Group meets on the first Wednesday of every month at the Stawell Health and Community Centre. 

Ms Boag said Sunday’s walk at Federation Square in Melbourne was an effort to make people more aware about Parkinson’s.

“It’s something that misses out on a lot of funding so it definitely needs more awareness,” she said. 

Parkinson’s Victoria chief executive Emma Collin said the Walk would give focus, increase awareness and raise funds to help the organisation deliver their services and support in the Parkinson’s community. 

“Each year, the last Sunday in August is all about coming together to support people impacted by Parkinson’s – recognise their strength, vitality and mantra to never give up.” she said. 

I try and tell others to think and stay positive. - Bev Boag

The story ‘The overwhelming tiredness is the worst part’ first appeared on The Stawell Times-News.

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