Creating workplaces free from violence and discrimination

Ararat Rural City CEO Andrew Evans, Women s Health Grampians Cassie Lindsay, Mayor Cr Paul Hooper and AME Systems Darren Bahl discuss the Act@Work program.  
 Picture: PETER PICKERING

Ararat Rural City CEO Andrew Evans, Women s Health Grampians Cassie Lindsay, Mayor Cr Paul Hooper and AME Systems Darren Bahl discuss the Act@Work program. Picture: PETER PICKERING

ARARAT - A project to create healthier workplaces, free from sexism, violence and discrimination has signed up AME Systems and Ararat Rural City Council as participants.

Women's Health Grampians will work with AME Systems and ARCC to implement Act@Work, a project aiming to build healthier workplaces with a culture of respect and non-violence, by encouraging workers to speak up.

"We spend a lot of time at work, so introducing this program in the workplace not only improves the work environment it means people take what they learn into their homes and communities," said Patty Kinnersly, CEO of Women's Health Grampians.

Act@Work is designed to help businesses and organisations build capacity, develop policies and procedures, and provide the practical tools employees need to play a role in preventing violence against women and children.

"At work we can't be silent bystanders, we need to step up and say something when we see sexism, discrimination and violence go unchallenged," Ms Kinnersly added.

AME Systems general manager, Dean Pinniger believes preventing violence against women and children is everyone's issue.

"The health and safety of employees, at home as well as at work, affects their health and safety on the job," he said.

With funding from the Victorian Department of Justice under the Reducing Violence against Women and their Children grants program, Act@Work is now working with four workplaces across the Central Highlands region to reinforce healthy, respectful behaviour, centering on what people in the workplace can do to make a difference.

Ararat Rural City Council CEO Andrew Evans believes that workplaces are an important part of our lives and the benefit of a healthy and respectful workplace extends far beyond individual workplaces as they can influence our families and the broader community.

"This violence is predominantly caused by men, and it is up to the rest of the male community to make it clear that it isn't normal (or acceptable) behaviour," he said.

" We need to stand up and say something when we see the signs (which we all do from time to time) and make it clear that those attitudes and behaviour are not to be tolerated in the workplace, or in the broader community."

Ms Kinnersley said Women's Health Grampians was thrilled to be working in the Ararat region with two industry leaders who are committed to lead the change centring on how workplaces and employees can become active bystanders and challenge sexism, discrimination and violence against women.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop