Historic homestead open to public this Easter

Kevin McIntyre conducts a tour of the historic Narrapumelap homestead, which he has painstakingly restored over many years. Picture: PETER PICKERING

Kevin McIntyre conducts a tour of the historic Narrapumelap homestead, which he has painstakingly restored over many years. Picture: PETER PICKERING

WICKLIFFE - Visitors to the region once again had the opportunity to be blown away by the heritage and colour of the historic Narrapumelap homestead and garden over Easter.

The French gothic inspired homestead has impressed generations of people since it was first built in the 1870s and has continued to mesmerise all who explore it, its gardens and marvel at the bronzed lions which guard the entrance.

Narrapumelap was built in 1873, commissioned by owner John Dickson Wyselaskie, who immigrated to Australia in 1837.

Wyselaskie (1818-1883) was a successful pastoralist and a philanthropist with his own intriguing life story.

Visitors to Narrapumelap discovered more about his life and enjoyed the dynamic revival of his house which has been described as a national treasure.

Wyselaskie moved to the Hopkins River and laid claim to 40,120 acres at the strategic crossing place on the road from Portland to Melbourne, taking up occupation by February 1841.

He named his run Narrapumelap after the Aboriginal name given to the chain of brackish waterholes on the Hopkins River.

The open days provide a unique opportunity to view the historic homestead widely recognised as an Australian Architectural masterpiece.

Guided tours were held throughout Easter and had a particular emphasis on the garden and the interior restoration.

Narrapumelap is open over the Easter and Melbourne Cup long weekends each year. Go to www.narrapumelap.com.au for information.

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